Talking To Your Children About Mental Illness

By Don Morgan

There are several reasons why your children will benefit from a discussion about the sensitive issue of mental illness.

Mental illness might sound like a topic best suited for grown-ups โ€“ a matter of concern only for adults or health care professionals. But itโ€™s a subject worth discussing with your children, too.

There are several reasons why your children will benefit from a discussion about this sensitive issue. For instance, the term โ€œmental illnessโ€ carries many negative connotations and is often rife with misunderstanding. Children, in particular, may only grasp this topic in terms of outdated depictions of โ€œcrazyโ€ characters theyโ€™ve seen on sitcoms or in cartoons. As a parent, you can help them sift fact from fiction and understand that mental illness impacts real people. It is no laughing matter.

A common misconception among many children (and some adults, for that matter) is that mental illness primarily impacts older people. But that is hardly the case. It affects children and young adults in a number of very real and significant ways.

After all, the term โ€œmental illnessโ€ encompasses a broad range of conditions, including not only things like borderline personality disorder, dissociative disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD โ€“ but also ADHD and numerous eating disorders. Whether in elementary, junior high or high school, itโ€™s likely that your children have encountered at least some of these conditions among their own peers.

In fact, the National Institute of Mental Health reports that one in five children aged 13-18 either have, or will have, a serious mental illness. In addition, 11 percent of youth have a mood disorder, 10 per cent have a behaviour or conduct disorder, and 8 per cent have an anxiety disorder.

This is the world your children live in! Information and awareness are critical for them โ€“ and for you โ€“ as you encounter real-life families struggling with mental health issues. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry recommends that parents employ the following techniques when broaching the subject of mental illness with their children:

  • Communicate in a straightforward manner.
  • Communicate at a level that is appropriate to a childโ€™s age and development level.
  • Have the discussion at a time and place the child feels safe and comfortable.
  • Observe their childโ€™s reaction during the discussion.
  • Slow down or back up if the child becomes confused or looks upset.

Your children are looking to you to set the tone for how mental illness is viewed and addressed. You can help them grasp the reality of this issue, especially as it impacts their peers and others around them.

ยฉ 2020 Focus on the Family. All rights reserved. Used with permission. Originally published at focusonthefamily.com.

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